Question:

"Are microlights safe (or should I say goodbye to my friends and family)?"

Answer:

Any type of flying is classed as a risk sport and accidents can happen.   If the engine stops, the pilot is trained to glide the aircraft to an appropriate position on the ground!   The good news is that a microlight aircraft requires less distance to land so there are always more safe landing opportunities than for conventional aircraft.

Microlighting is governed by the Civil Aviation Authority via the British Microlight Aircraft Association [www.bmaa.org]to one of the highest standards in Europe.   The BMAA inspect each microlight every year and microlight flying instructors are licensed and re-examined every two years.

Question:

"How much will a NPPL Microlight licence cost and how long will the course take?"

Answer:

The cost of a licence depends on your life experience [age!] and the frequency of lessons.   The minimum requirement for a microlight licence is 25 hours of which 10 hours must be solo.   Funny isn’t it? In a car a Learner must have someone with them all the time but in an aircraft one must prove one can fly by being by yourself! A light aircraft licence is 34 hours or more with a similar syllabus so a rough idea of the cost of a licence would be 34 x £110 = £3740 probably taking two seasons.   A pre-payment of 10 hours or more qualifies you for an 8% discount at flights-with-rosie.

Question:

"I’m ‘getting on a bit’ now but I've always wanted to fly. Can I do this flying thing or is it too late?"

Answer:

Start today!

“If one wants to attain something in life, one must accept the cost.” I’m not talking money necessarily, but the extra time, study or change of methods to make up for an individual difficulty. Geoff started his licence at 70. He had a slow start, unlearning those life experiences that were holding him back but he got his licence and loves his flying.

Question:

"Surely I can do 25 hours flying instruction in a week?"

Answer:

Sounds like it, doesn’t it? However, one must consider that every hour of flying instruction needs at least another hour for pre-brief, (to prepare you properly for the exercise) and then the de-brief afterwards to clarify onward progress.

It is possible to have two lessons in a day but one needs a mental rest in between. The brain has got to ‘process’ the first lesson for there to be any learning.

I would advise having lessons close together near the beginning of the course and especially near to going solo.

If you have to save for each lesson it is better to save for a number of hours and then fly when the weather is good enough. Big gaps in between lessons leads to reprising a lot rather than progressing.

Question:

"Are women better pilots than men?"

Answer:

How could I ever suggest that?! It depends on the woman and the man.

Learning never stops especially after gaining a pilot’s licence. Thereafter one tries to apply that knowledge as well as continue to practise.

Question:

"What does one have to do to get a National Private Pilot's Licence (Microlight Rating)?"

Answer:

To qualify for a National Private Pilot’s Licence Microlight Rating you will require to:

  • Have a minimum of 25 hours flying instruction at a microlight school. 10 hours of which must be solo – i.e. on your lonesome, so Rosie has to know you will bring her aircraft back!
  • Pass 5 multi-choice ground exams: Aviation Law, HPL, Meteorology, Aeroplanes-Part One and Navigation.
  • Pass the General Skills Test at the end of the course.
  • Informative explanation - BMAA licensed flying
Question:

"Does the weather have much influence on flying?"

Answer:

YES!

Like all flying activities, microlight flying is affected by the weather. If it is too windy (more than 15mph) the aircraft will be more difficult and less enjoyable to fly. Low visibility is no fun either. To be legal we require 3000m horizontal visibility outside controlled airspace.

So once you’ve booked your flight please confirm on the evening before (Students: as otherwise arranged) to find out the expected weather conditions and the field to be used.

In flying we need to be as flexible as possible. If you see that the weather is good enough, give Rosie a call to see whether she is available too!

‘There is no point doing a chore on a good flying day but not being able to fly the next.’

We all become ‘uncertain of our position’ at one time or another. Always get a met forecast before flight. NB Motorway signs are fairly large….. but that’s another story!